Blog

LIRS and Lutheran Leaders Call for Passage of the DREAM Act

The DREAM Act is bipartisan legislation that has been introduced in every legislative session since 2001. The bill would allow undocumented students who were brought to the United States as children, who are long-term U.S. residents, and have good moral character to become lawful permanent residents provided that for two years they attend college or serve in the U.S. military.

Bishop Riley on Advocacy

Bishop E. Roy Riley, of the New Jersey Synod of the ELCA, is the LIRS Board Chair and Executive Committee Chair. In a conversation during the summit he acknowledged the necessity for Lutheran leaders to gather in the nation’s capital on an annual basis and to be “relentless” in their efforts to work with political leaders to enact change.

A Strong Heart and New Friends

As with any arriving refugee who has a documented health condition or medical need, Abdi was taken by LSG to doctors and he learned that his heart condition was very serious and that he would require open heart surgery to live a normal life.

Dreaming in D.C.

Last week, First Trinity Lutheran Church in D.C held a candlelight vigil for young students organizing in favor of the DREAM Act. Organized by PICO National Network and United We DREAM the vigil brought together faith leaders and “dreamers”: young immigrants who came to this country as children and now, as they get ready to go off to college or serve in the military, find themselves denied the opportunity to live a full and productive life.

“It’s Good to Return Good for Good”

Seven years after her arrival we visited the Kpukumu household on a Sunday afternoon. Family members were bustling about in nervous excitement preparing for a festive family meal. Florie observed everything with the calm of an old matriarch. When we sat down to talk she explained to me why she shares the little she has with LIRS.

International Day Of Persons with Disabilities

Today is the International Day of Persons with Disabilities. LIRS has a special concern for persons with disabilities as a number of refugees that are resettled in the US have a disability. Currently this population has been struggling with even greater challenges. On October 1, 2010, close to three thousand elderly or permanently disabled refugees lost their major (or sole) source of income and face a bleak future. They rely on modest cash assistance called Supplemental Security Income (SSI) as their only source of income.

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