HEADLINES: Immigration – July 11th, 2013

Published On: Donate

button_icon_immigration_headlinesVisit our blog every Thursday for HEADLINES: Immigration.   I will bring you all the most important and up-to-date news on the immigration debate.  From reform to detention to the DREAM Act, HEADLINES: Immigration gives easy access to all the news you want in one place.

Obama Set to Make Public Case Amid Immigration Opposition.  President Barack Obama will step up his efforts to drive an immigration bill through the U.S. House by using a tool that has failed him on issues from gun control to budget cuts — the bully pulpit.  [Bloomberg]

Boehner Warns House GOP Will be Weaker Without Immigration Reform.  Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) and Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) urged their House Republican colleagues to pass immigration reform legislation in a closed-door meeting Wednesday, with the Speaker arguing his conference would be “in a much weaker position” if it failed to act.  [The Hill]

Immigration Support Grows.  Americans are more supportive of immigration than ever, according to a new poll, with a record-low number of people wanting to decrease the flow of immigration.  [Politico]

Immigration Reform Advocates Prepare for the Tough Road Ahead.  It’s going to be tough but doable. That’s how immigration reform advocates describe the road ahead to pass an immigration reform bill in the Republican-led House of Representatives.  [Huffington Post]

No Easy Path As House Republicans Meet on Immigration.  When House Republicans gather for a private conclave at the Capitol Wednesday to map out their strategy for dealing with immigration reform, they will have plenty of options to choose from—and an obstacle blocking each one.  [TIME]

Dem Poll: Vulnerable House Republicans Could Face Backlash Over Immigration.  Republicans could face a backlash from voters if they vote against immigration reform, according to a new survey from Democratic pollster Public Policy Polling (PPP).  [The Hill]

Advocates of Senate Bill Turn Their Attention to the House.  When House members left for the July Fourth recess, the prospects for an immigration overhaul in the lower chamber were slim. When members return this week, they will be greeted by the full attention of a coalition of advocates who helped push the Senate bill to completion and who are now turning their sights to the House.  [National Journal]

LGBT Immigrant Rights Gets Second Chance, Seven Weeks Later.  Barely two months after ducking a politically difficult gay rights vote during the immigration debate, nearly two dozen Democratic senators jumped onto a letter urging Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano to make changes that would permit gay Americans to sponsor their foreign spouses for green cards.

Leave a Comment

Newsletter Sign Up
Stay up to date with everything going on at LIRS.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.