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Refugees

Today we are facing the worst global refugee crisis in history. Nearly 65 million people have been displaced by violence and persecution.

As a vital arm of the United States refugee resettlement program, LIRS works every day to pair vulnerable refugees with LIRS service partners who are uniquely equipped to support their needs.

In 2016, LIRS resettled more than 13,000 refugees. Our robust network of service partners, volunteers and churches connects refugees with basic, essential services, while also helping them integrate into their new communities. Successful protection, stabilization, and integration processes are core elements of our mission.

Welcome and Stabilization Services

LIRS works closely with service partners and volunteers, including churches, to provide protection and stabilization support to refugees during their first days in the United States. 

Through the Matching Grant program, LIRS is able to help refugees become employed early in the resettlement process, and ultimately self-sufficient. In 2016, 87% of those enrolled in Matching Grant through LIRS had at least one member of the household employed within 180 days of arrival.
 

SERVING THE MOST VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

LIRS provides long-term case management services to especially vulnerable refugees and other eligible populations to help address physical and mental health needs, enhance life skills, and engage in meaningful activities that lead to social cohesion and community integration.
 

PROMOTING ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT

At LIRS, we view economic empowerment as a cornerstone of successful refugee resettlement. Through strategic partnerships, we have established training programs, employment opportunities, and other targeted economic resources for refugees in communities across the country.

For nearly 20 years, LIRS has also partnered with Higher, a national technical assistance provider, used by all refugee resettlement agencies with a network of more than 350 local organizations. Higher assists corporations, states, counties, mainstream workforce development boards, American Job Centers, and others in their efforts to help refugees gain economic stability.